UCSF home page UCSF home page About UCSF UCSF Medical Center
UCSF navigation bar
UCSF home page UCSF home page About UCSF UCSF Medical Center
UCSF navigation bar

John A. Gray, MD PhD

During my residency training in psychiatry, I became interested in the role of abnormal glutamatergic function in schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. Because of this interest, I pursued postdoctoral research in the Nicoll Lab, where I have been examining the role of NMDA receptor subunit function in early synaptic development and am currently studying the molecular mechanisms underlying the trafficking and post-translational regulation of NMDA receptors. My long-term goal is to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in synapse development and plasticity and how these processes may be disrupted in neuropsychiatric disorders.

As a graduate student, I worked with Dr. Bryan Roth at Case Western Reserve University (now at UNC) and examined the mechanisms underlying the desensitization and down-regulation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT2A receptors are unique among G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in that in vivo they are down-regulated, not up-regulated, by chronic administration of antagonists, including many antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs. My work in the Roth lab demonstrated that 5-HT2A receptors were differentially regulated by arrestin proteins compared with the dogmatic β2-adrenergic receptor and provided a unified model for the atypical regulation of 5-HT2A receptors by arrestins in cortical pyramidal neurons.

C.V.

Publications

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it